Tidbits - August 20, 2020

TIDBITS by RALPH SHEALY

 

PLENTY TO WATCH  

  Thank goodness for television. During the world’s previous pandemics, what did people do to pass the time?

  I guess with little media back then, they were scared to death. There was no instant news, like today. You could catch the Spanish flu before you knew it existed.

  I’m not a social butterfly, so I didn’t go out much before the pandemic began. Now, I don’t go out because there is no where to go.

  My routine now is to start watching something on a streaming service at 7 p.m. At 10 p.m., I go to my bedroom, and start streaming again ... but I usually fall asleep before the program is over.

  I am hooked on British crime dramas, even though I can’t understand the language at times. “Midsomer Murders” is my favorite, but “Vera.” “Father Brown,” “Murder in Paradise,” “Shakespeare and Hathaway,” and “Silent Witness” are not far behind.

  I guess since I’m 52 percent  British, and 12 percent Scottish-Irish, I should be watching programs from Great Britain. It’s in my blood.

  The British comedies are also good. I’ve watched the entire “Keeping Up Appearances” series at least three times. Some of the series could definitely never be shown on network TV in America.

  I also like science fiction. During the pandemic, I’ve completed “Warrior Nun,” and “Witchery.” I’m now watching “Cursed,”  “The Umbrella Academy,” and “Mandolorian.”

  Some of the popular series I haven’t been able to get into. I’ve watched most of “Outer Banks,” because it’s filmed in an around Charleston. I just don’t like any of the characters, and I’m about 50 years too old for this this teen genre.

  I also started watching “Sweet Magnolias,”  because the program is set in S.C. It’s not really a “boy” program. I do like most of the characters in this one.

  I was disappointed with “Perry Mason” on HBO to  begin with, because it was not the Raymond  Burr Perry Mason, I grew up loving.

  In the new version, Perry starts out as a private eye working for a lawyer. After the lawyer dies in the fourth or fifth episode, Perry passes the bar exam and takes over the trial in the case he was working on. The new “Perry Mason” turned out to be great.

  The biggest problem with all the shows in streaming services is trying to remember which service the program is on, but the good news is you can watch your favorite programs any time.

 

HOW MANY?

  We’re all hoping there is going to be Carolina, Clemson and high school football this year.

  The question is, “How many can attend?”

  Gov. McMaster has set a 250 maximum attendance figure for events.. If that holds up for football, only the players and coaches can attend games.

  Ray Tanner, however, has said he expects a maximum of 20,000 at Williams-Brice, or 25 percent of capacity.

  If my memory serves me correctly, the Bettis Herlong Stadium at Matthew Field seats 6400, 2400 on the visitor’s side, and 4000 on the home. Using Tanner’s plan, 1600 fans can attend. That certainly will be better than no fans in the stands. Of course, social distancing will have to be observed.

  There’s a photo circulating around social media of fans at a football game during the flu pandemic in 1918. There was no social distancing, but every fan was wearing a mask.

 

KAY RUFF

  Kay Ruff was a joy to know. You never saw her without laughing.

  Those of us who grew up here, and went to Dr. Jug Sawyer’s office were fondly greeted by his nurse Kay.

  Kay, Nellie Ruth Boozer and Joann Keeler worked together at the office for years, and anytime Kay or Nellie Ruth visited the Sentinel office to see Joann, the place would soon  be filled with giggling.

  They are all together  now, joking with Jug.

  Kay followed the lead of her legendary teacher mother, Ethel Johnson. She cared for all the people in which she came in contact.

  She will be greatly missed.